Creativity:  How to Unlock Your Hidden Creative Genius

Here is today’s post about Creativity.  I found this man’s site by accident when I was researching something totally different.  I signed up for his newsletter after reading this article.  You can click over to his site and sign up to receive this ebook which is worth reading.

Also at his site, you will find references to other articles he has written about creativity that might be what you are looking for.  My favorite nugget in this article is about Green Eggs and Ham, but you may find something else more to your liking than that.

Please click over, sign up for the ebook and his newsletter, then read this entire article.  He makes really good sense and his writing is easy to read and understand.

____________________________________________________________

Creativity: 
How to Unlock Your Hidden Creative Genius

Mastering Creativity by James Clear

Read this guide and discover the creative strategies of the greatest artists, musicians, and writers in the world—Pablo Picasso, Franz Kafka, Dr. Seuss and many more.

The full guide is packed with 36 pages of information on how creativity works, how to overcome the mental blocks that all artists face, and how to make creative thinking a habit.

creative-process

What is Creativity?

Let’s define creativity.

The creative process is the act of making new connections between old ideas or recognizing relationships between concepts. Creative thinking is not about generating something new from a blank slate, but rather about taking what is already present and combining those bits and pieces in a way that has not been done previously.

While being creative isn’t easy, nearly all great ideas follow a similar creative process. In 1940, an advertising executive named James Webb Young published a short guide titled, A Technique for Producing Ideas.

Young believed the process of creative connection always occurred in five steps.

The Creative Process

  1. Gather new material. At first, you learn. During this stage you focus on 1) learning specific material directly related to your task and 2) learning general material by becoming fascinated with a wide range of concepts.
  2. Thoroughly work over the materials in your mind. During this stage, you examine what you have learned by looking at the facts from different angles and experimenting with fitting various ideas together.
  3. Step away from the problem. Next, you put the problem completely out of your mind and go do something else that excites you and energizes you.
  4. Let your idea return to you. At some point, but only after you have stopped thinking about it, your idea will come back to you with a flash of insight and renewed energy.

Read the entire article here.

This entry was posted in being creative, Blog posts, creative exercises, Creativity, self expression and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.